Jewish Biography
 

Related Links

Biographies
Jewish Memoirs
List of Jews
List of Rabbis
Actors & Actresses
American authors
Jewish Chefs
Chess Players
Computer Scientists
Economists
Film Directors
Jewish Americans
Jewish Comedians
Jewish CEOs
Jewish Comics
Jewish Dancers
Jewish Head States
Jewish Magicians
Jewish Models
Jewish Producers
Jewish Poker Players
Jewish Philosopher
Jewish Theater
Jewish TV
Jewish Radio
Mathematicians
Motion Pictures
Music businessmen
Jewish Poets
Jewish Cartoonist
Jewish Women
Playwrights
Representatives
Senators
Singers
Songwriters
Wrestlers
Featured Jews
Harry Houdini
Hogan's Heroes
Marx Brothers
Seinfeld
The Three Stooges

-- Jewish Links --

Jewish Books
Jewish Links
Jewish Catalogs
Jewish Posters
Jewish Stories
Jewish Videos
Judaica
Judaism
Kosher Wines
Jewish Biography --> Biographies --> List of Jews --> List of Rabbis
Sponsored listings for Jewish Recipes and Kosher Cooking
Antigonus of Sokho (Hebrew: אנטיגנוס איש סוכו) was the first scholar of whom Pharisee tradition has preserved not only the name but also an important theological doctrine. He flourished about the first half of the third century BCE. According to the Mishnah, he was the disciple and successor of Simon the Just (Hebrew: שמעון הצדיק). His motto ran: "Be not like servants who serve their master for the sake of reward; rather, be like servants who do not serve their master for the sake of reward, and let the awe of Heaven be upon you"(Artscroll translation)[1] Short as this maxim is, it contains the whole Pharisaic doctrine, which is very different from what it is usually conceived to be. Thus the first known Pharisee urges that good should be done for its own sake, and evil be avoided, without regard to consequences, whether advantageous or detrimental. The conception dominant in the Hebrew Bible, that God's will must be done to obtain His favor in the shape of physical prosperity, is rejected by Antigonus, as well as the view, specifically called "Pharisaic," which makes reward in the afterlife the motive for human virtue.

Antigonus points out that men's actions should not be influenced by the lowly sentiment of fear of mortals, but that there is a divine judgment of which men must stand in awe. The expression "Heaven" for "God" is the oldest evidence in postexilic Judaism of the development of the idea of a transcendental Deity. It is also a curious fact that Antigonus is the first noted Jew to have a Greek name. Later legend connects Antigonus with the origin of the Sadducee sect. The tale is that Tzadok, the founder of the Sadducees, misconstrued his teachings (the above motto) to mean that there is no afterlife, it was then that he and his partner left the fold.

Aharon's Jewish Books and Judaica
600 South Holly Street Suite 103
Denver, Colorado 80246
303-322-7345
800-830-8660

Map to Aharon's Jewish Books and Judaica

Store Hours

Monday through Thursday 9 AM to 6 PM
Friday 9 AM to 2 PM
Sunday 9 AM to 4 PM

 

Jewish Biography | About Jewish Biography | Search

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the